Author: BBC Reporter's Notebook

After a long career in television, Bill Proctor could have spent his retirement out of the spotlight. Instead, he has been trying to track a killer

 TV reporter spends retirement investigating brutal murder

After a long career in television, Bill Proctor could have spent his retirement out of the spotlight. Instead, he has been trying to track a killer

 TV reporter spends retirement investigating brutal murder

North America reporter Rajini Vaidyanathan keeps it cool when an errant backpack shows up in her live shot while covering the first trial over the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore 

North America reporter Rajini Vaidyanathan keeps it cool when an errant backpack shows up in her live shot while covering the first trial over the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore 

nchbwproject:

Nancy has received the Komla Dumor Award. Congrats Nancy.

nchbwproject:

Nancy has received the Komla Dumor Award. Congrats Nancy.

nethenclawpuff:

So watching BBC World News whilst getting ready for dinner and apparently their pop up team is in Canada.

For those who don’t know this is a team of BBC journalists who travel around looking for stories in an area or country that don’t often break the headlines.

So they’re looking for stories via Twitter. Think the hashtag is #bbcpopup but I’d check.

So any Canadians on here let them know. Be it about Mounties Vs Indigenous People or elections or anything

Thought I’d let you know.

Yes we are – watch more here and follow along with our Pop Up blog 

nethenclawpuff:

So watching BBC World News whilst getting ready for dinner and apparently their pop up team is in Canada.

For those who don’t know this is a team of BBC journalists who travel around looking for stories in an area or country that don’t often break the headlines.

So they’re looking for stories via Twitter. Think the hashtag is #bbcpopup but I’d check.

So any Canadians on here let them know. Be it about Mounties Vs Indigenous People or elections or anything

Thought I’d let you know.

Yes we are – watch more here and follow along with our Pop Up blog 

Why do South African newspapers always discuss the alleged “genocide” against white farmers, while ignoring the far more bloody and systematic campaign of violence against impoverished Somali shopkeepers in Soweto or around Cape Town?

Why do the television crews still gravitate towards foreign humanitarian workers during emergencies, with their convenient planes and well-stocked compounds?

And – in the same spirit – how much unquestioning focus should one give to the “Africa Rising” narrative, so well articulated by the social-media-wired, urban, aspirational middle classes of Nairobi or Lagos?

Because the truth, hard-learned on dirt roads and neglected corners, is that the majority – the often-voiceless majority – on this continent are still facing daunting challenges: from soaring prices, to unemployment, wretched schools and hospitals, an absence of justice, and most pressingly of all – insecurity.

That applies in the beleaguered townships of South Africa, in the forests of the Central African Republic, the besieged towns of north-eastern Nigeria, the slums of Monrovia, and on the endless battlefields of South Sudan.

Of course there is plenty going impressively, fantastically right here – the arc of history bending towards optimism and all that.

But it seems to me that a bias towards the powerless and voiceless is a reasonable and necessary one – especially when they still seem to be in the majority.

Why do South African newspapers always discuss the alleged “genocide” against white farmers, while ignoring the far more bloody and systematic campaign of violence against impoverished Somali shopkeepers in Soweto or around Cape Town?

Why do the television crews still gravitate towards foreign humanitarian workers during emergencies, with their convenient planes and well-stocked compounds?

And – in the same spirit – how much unquestioning focus should one give to the “Africa Rising” narrative, so well articulated by the social-media-wired, urban, aspirational middle classes of Nairobi or Lagos?

Because the truth, hard-learned on dirt roads and neglected corners, is that the majority – the often-voiceless majority – on this continent are still facing daunting challenges: from soaring prices, to unemployment, wretched schools and hospitals, an absence of justice, and most pressingly of all – insecurity.

That applies in the beleaguered townships of South Africa, in the forests of the Central African Republic, the besieged towns of north-eastern Nigeria, the slums of Monrovia, and on the endless battlefields of South Sudan.

Of course there is plenty going impressively, fantastically right here – the arc of history bending towards optimism and all that.

But it seems to me that a bias towards the powerless and voiceless is a reasonable and necessary one – especially when they still seem to be in the majority.