Category: digital

Jered Threatin

Jered Threatin:

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Jessica Lussenhop’s article is bloody brilliant, one to mull over with a nice hot drink and ponder – don’t skim good journalistic writing.

Update: 19 December 2018

“The publicity stunt for this is done,” Jered Eames assured me at the end of our interview. “Anything I’ve said to you is factual.”

To prove that he was indeed the one that tipped off the media to the hoax Eames forwarded me 16 different news tips sent from the “E. Evieknowsit” account. Four of them were sent to two different general BBC news tip email addresses, and the earliest of those was dated 4 November – five days before the first stories broke.

My colleagues looked for the emails, but because those inboxes are routinely purged, they had nothing.

After we first published our story, I began reaching out to reporters at the other outlets who had allegedly been sent emails. The earliest one was reportedly sent on 2 November to the “tips” inbox for the entertainment magazine Variety.

“Yes, we got this email,” a helpful Variety reporter wrote back, attaching a copy with the exact same text that Jered had shared with me.

Then I looked closer. The timestamp on Jered’s copy said it was sent on “Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 12:16 PM”. The copy from the Variety reporter read, “Sat, Nov 17, 2018 at 4:32 PM”.

An editor at MetalSucks, which did some of the earliest breaking stories on Threatin, could not find an alleged 7 November email that Jered shared with me. Instead, he found a different email from Evie in their inbox, pointing him to a YouTube clip from one of Threatin’s empty shows. It was dated 17 November.

As I went down the line, I found that the New York Times, Ultimate Classic Rock and Metal Insider all got the “E. Evieknowsit” email on 17 November. But by this date, these outlets had already extensively covered the Threatin story.

Finally, the BBC’s IT specialists managed to recover two deleted messages from “E. Evieknowsit”.

Both were sent on 17 November, less than an hour apart.

When I texted Jered to tell him what I’d found, he said he would respond.

Jered Threatin

Jered Threatin:

image


Jessica Lussenhop’s article is bloody brilliant, one to mull over with a nice hot drink and ponder – don’t skim good journalistic writing.

Update: 19 December 2018

“The publicity stunt for this is done,” Jered Eames assured me at the end of our interview. “Anything I’ve said to you is factual.”

To prove that he was indeed the one that tipped off the media to the hoax Eames forwarded me 16 different news tips sent from the “E. Evieknowsit” account. Four of them were sent to two different general BBC news tip email addresses, and the earliest of those was dated 4 November – five days before the first stories broke.

My colleagues looked for the emails, but because those inboxes are routinely purged, they had nothing.

After we first published our story, I began reaching out to reporters at the other outlets who had allegedly been sent emails. The earliest one was reportedly sent on 2 November to the “tips” inbox for the entertainment magazine Variety.

“Yes, we got this email,” a helpful Variety reporter wrote back, attaching a copy with the exact same text that Jered had shared with me.

Then I looked closer. The timestamp on Jered’s copy said it was sent on “Fri, Nov 2, 2018 at 12:16 PM”. The copy from the Variety reporter read, “Sat, Nov 17, 2018 at 4:32 PM”.

An editor at MetalSucks, which did some of the earliest breaking stories on Threatin, could not find an alleged 7 November email that Jered shared with me. Instead, he found a different email from Evie in their inbox, pointing him to a YouTube clip from one of Threatin’s empty shows. It was dated 17 November.

As I went down the line, I found that the New York Times, Ultimate Classic Rock and Metal Insider all got the “E. Evieknowsit” email on 17 November. But by this date, these outlets had already extensively covered the Threatin story.

Finally, the BBC’s IT specialists managed to recover two deleted messages from “E. Evieknowsit”.

Both were sent on 17 November, less than an hour apart.

When I texted Jered to tell him what I’d found, he said he would respond.

RICHARD BENTALL: Delusions, Paranoia and Socia…

RICHARD BENTALL: Delusions, Paranoia and Social Identity:

Lunctime lecture for you guys from Professor Richard Bentall. A fascinating breakdown of how social identity and mental health are so closely connected.

Digital Human: Series 16, Episode 4 – Illusion

RICHARD BENTALL: Delusions, Paranoia and Socia…

RICHARD BENTALL: Delusions, Paranoia and Social Identity:

Lunctime lecture for you guys from Professor Richard Bentall. A fascinating breakdown of how social identity and mental health are so closely connected.

Digital Human: Series 16, Episode 4 – Illusion

Jered Threatin: “I Turned an Empty Room into a…

Jered Threatin: “I Turned an Empty Room into an International Headline” | MetalSucks:

“What is Fake News? I turned an empty room into an international headline. If you are reading this, you are part of the illusion. #Marketing #Psychology#SocialMedia #FakeNews #Threatin #BreakingTheWorld #MusicIndustry@NBCNews @BBCNews @JoeRogan @RollingStone @billboard

OMG! Don’t we all feel like assholes now*? JERED THREATIN DID IT ALL TO TEACH US A LESSON ABOUT FAKE NEWS!!! He’s not a failed musician-turned-con artist, he’s a brilliant social critic!!! How did we not understand this all along?!?!?!

Look, I suppose it’s possible that Jered has pulled some genius Andy Kaufman-level performance art stunt here**. It’s also possible Axl Rose is going to call me later today and offer me a million dollars to be his official biographer. It seems improbable, but it’s not impossible.

Meanwhile, this morning’s article sent off a landslide of new sources contacting MetalSucks. Expect this story to somehow get even more bizarre in the next few days.

*Probably still smaller, less stinky assholes than a guy who sent out a graphic of his own quote, though.
**Although I’m not sure what the lesson/point would be; this doesn’t teach us anything about Fake News because it’s not Fake News — the fact that someone was able to trick so many other people using social media is an amazing, very much of-the-moment story. If he taught anyone a “lesson,” it’s the venues I guess? Maybe the lesson here is simply that people who unironically use the term ‘Fake News’ are generally full of Real Shit.

Digital Human: Series 16, Episode 4 – Illusion

Jered Threatin: “I Turned an Empty Room into a…

Jered Threatin: “I Turned an Empty Room into an International Headline” | MetalSucks:

“What is Fake News? I turned an empty room into an international headline. If you are reading this, you are part of the illusion. #Marketing #Psychology#SocialMedia #FakeNews #Threatin #BreakingTheWorld #MusicIndustry@NBCNews @BBCNews @JoeRogan @RollingStone @billboard

OMG! Don’t we all feel like assholes now*? JERED THREATIN DID IT ALL TO TEACH US A LESSON ABOUT FAKE NEWS!!! He’s not a failed musician-turned-con artist, he’s a brilliant social critic!!! How did we not understand this all along?!?!?!

Look, I suppose it’s possible that Jered has pulled some genius Andy Kaufman-level performance art stunt here**. It’s also possible Axl Rose is going to call me later today and offer me a million dollars to be his official biographer. It seems improbable, but it’s not impossible.

Meanwhile, this morning’s article sent off a landslide of new sources contacting MetalSucks. Expect this story to somehow get even more bizarre in the next few days.

*Probably still smaller, less stinky assholes than a guy who sent out a graphic of his own quote, though.
**Although I’m not sure what the lesson/point would be; this doesn’t teach us anything about Fake News because it’s not Fake News — the fact that someone was able to trick so many other people using social media is an amazing, very much of-the-moment story. If he taught anyone a “lesson,” it’s the venues I guess? Maybe the lesson here is simply that people who unironically use the term ‘Fake News’ are generally full of Real Shit.

Digital Human: Series 16, Episode 4 – Illusion

Why The Internet Is A Bad Place To Discover Mu…

Why The Internet Is A Bad Place To Discover Music:

1. Music choice is more about personal identity than it is about anything else.

Personal identity is spread through human interaction — that means what your friends listen too, or what your diaspora listens to — you probably listen to as well. Humans look to other humans for the social clues that help them decide what their identity should be, and in that way, that is how music discovery is spread as well.

That’s a long way of saying this: Yes, we are overwhelmed by all the music choices available to us, but we find new music the way new music has always been found — word of mouth.

How do you think Bach got his gigs? Word of mouth. How did Kanye blow up? Word of mouth.

What the music industries needs more of is streaming services with these social cues. Spotify should tell me that 30% of my Facebook friends (or, now, Google+ connections) are listening to the Black Eyed Peas. Or that 70% of listeners from my (hyper-local) area have started listening to Justin Beiber’s new album. I’m much more likely to listen to it is my friends (or merely people near me) are also listening.

Because music creates self-identity — which, in turn, creates something much more valuable: community.

If the music industry decided to start selling “community” instead of “music”, they’d be better off.

.2. Most music discovery platforms are in the wrong place.

Do you know the story of Joshua Bell playing violin in the Washington subway? He, one of the best violin virtuosos in the world, played piece-after-piece of classical repertoire. He played for 45 minutes and made $32.

To me, this was a ridiculous exercise. It proves two things to me:

1) The venue is much more important than the music or the musician

2) Never mistake a busy street for a venue

People are walking by. They left their houses because they had somewhere to go. Some middle aged guy with a fancy violin doesn’t change the fact that they need to catch a train to get to work.

How arrogant do you have to be to expect people to stop their lives to listen to your music? Give me a break.

Here is the important part: Facebook, Twitter, and most of the internet is a street. It is not a venue. People are on their way somewhere. They are doing things. They are busy. The internet is, then, not necessarily the best place for people to discover, and fall in love with, a song or an artist.

So if it seems that listeners are overwhelmed, that they are not finding the music they want, or nobody cares about “my” music — it’s because listeners are not in a venue that makes the music matter.

Digital Human: Series 16, Episode 4 – Illusion

Why The Internet Is A Bad Place To Discover Mu…

Why The Internet Is A Bad Place To Discover Music:

1. Music choice is more about personal identity than it is about anything else.

Personal identity is spread through human interaction — that means what your friends listen too, or what your diaspora listens to — you probably listen to as well. Humans look to other humans for the social clues that help them decide what their identity should be, and in that way, that is how music discovery is spread as well.

That’s a long way of saying this: Yes, we are overwhelmed by all the music choices available to us, but we find new music the way new music has always been found — word of mouth.

How do you think Bach got his gigs? Word of mouth. How did Kanye blow up? Word of mouth.

What the music industries needs more of is streaming services with these social cues. Spotify should tell me that 30% of my Facebook friends (or, now, Google+ connections) are listening to the Black Eyed Peas. Or that 70% of listeners from my (hyper-local) area have started listening to Justin Beiber’s new album. I’m much more likely to listen to it is my friends (or merely people near me) are also listening.

Because music creates self-identity — which, in turn, creates something much more valuable: community.

If the music industry decided to start selling “community” instead of “music”, they’d be better off.

.2. Most music discovery platforms are in the wrong place.

Do you know the story of Joshua Bell playing violin in the Washington subway? He, one of the best violin virtuosos in the world, played piece-after-piece of classical repertoire. He played for 45 minutes and made $32.

To me, this was a ridiculous exercise. It proves two things to me:

1) The venue is much more important than the music or the musician

2) Never mistake a busy street for a venue

People are walking by. They left their houses because they had somewhere to go. Some middle aged guy with a fancy violin doesn’t change the fact that they need to catch a train to get to work.

How arrogant do you have to be to expect people to stop their lives to listen to your music? Give me a break.

Here is the important part: Facebook, Twitter, and most of the internet is a street. It is not a venue. People are on their way somewhere. They are doing things. They are busy. The internet is, then, not necessarily the best place for people to discover, and fall in love with, a song or an artist.

So if it seems that listeners are overwhelmed, that they are not finding the music they want, or nobody cares about “my” music — it’s because listeners are not in a venue that makes the music matter.

Digital Human: Series 16, Episode 4 – Illusion

threatin Archives | MetalSucks

threatin Archives | MetalSucks:

image

To be honest, if you want to get a handle on all the twist and turns in this story you’ve gotta go back and read from the beginning. Going backwords works too if you’re that way inclined I guess.

Digital Human: Series 16, Episode 4 – Illusion

threatin Archives | MetalSucks

threatin Archives | MetalSucks:

image

To be honest, if you want to get a handle on all the twist and turns in this story you’ve gotta go back and read from the beginning. Going backwords works too if you’re that way inclined I guess.

Digital Human: Series 16, Episode 4 – Illusion