Category: facial recognition

Has This Man Unlocked The Secret To Internet Anonymity?:

I’ve met Jonathan Hirshon. I know what Jonathan Hirshon looks like. You probably don’t, and neither does Google or Facebook. That’s just how the PR professional wants it.

Hirshon is shorter than most, and balding. He wears glasses. He’s friendly, and well liked in the tech industry. Back in the late ’90s, he did in-house PR for Apple.

At 48, Hirshon was an adult well before the Internet was a mainstream tool. Though he’s a pro when it comes to getting his clients publicity, he’s dead-set against his own image being online.

It must have worked, since a Google image search for his name doesn’t return a single picture that’s actually him.

Digital Human, Series 18, Episode 6: Faceless

Hong Kong protesters devise face-covering hairstyle to get around mask ban:

Protesters in Hong Kong have devised a new face-covering hairstyle to evade the new ban on masks.

A tutorial video showing viewers how to plait their hair to achieve the anonymising hairstyle was shared on Twitter by journalist Cherie Chan.

It came as tens of thousands of masked protesters poured onto Hong Kong’s streets on Sunday as they furiously yelled: “Wearing a mask is not a crime.”

Digital Human, Series 18, Episode 6: Faceless

FACELESS short documentary was produced on request of Jos de Putter for De Correspondent.

As follow up of the exhibition that Bogmor Doringer curated in collaboration with Brigitte Felderer and staged on the topic of hidden faces in contemporary society after 9-11.

Digital Human, Series 18, Episode 6: Faceless

Faceless. Re-inventing Privacy Through Subversive Media Strategies:

The contributions to this book explore a phenomenon that appears to be a contradiction in itself – we, the users of computers, can be tracked in digital space for all eternity. Although, on the one hand, one wants to be noticed and noticeable, on the other hand one does not necessarily want to be recognized at the first instance, being prey to an unfathomable public, or – even less so – to lose face.

Digital Human, Series 18, Episode 6: Faceless

Cameras and other technological products make for a better and safer living environment than ever before. Mega databanks and high-resolution cameras in the streets stock hundreds of exabytes a year. But who has access to this data? It is possible that it could have commercial use, hence not only retail companies but also the advertisement industry could be very interested in this data in the coming future. They would hope to gain these personal data and information as much as they can.

In the future, the advertisement could call your name when you walk along the streets. The companies would know your interests and may set different retail strategies for you. It could be convenient for customers, but personal thoughts and opinions should be kept private. This product protects you from this privacy violation.

The concept from Jing-cai Liu:  Wearable face projector– A small beamer projects a different appearance on your face, giving you a completely new appearance.

Digital Human, Series 18, Episode 6: Faceless

Face Cages | Zach Blas:

The success of today’s booming biometrics industry resides in its promise to rapidly measure an objective, truthful, and core identity from the surface of a human body, often for a mixture of commercial, state, and military interests. Yet, feminist communications scholar Shoshana Amielle Magnet has described this neoliberal enterprise as producing “a cage of information,” a form of policing, surveillance, and structural violence that is ableist, classist, homophobic, racist, sexist, and transphobic.

Biometric machines often fail to recognize non-normative, minoritarian persons, which makes such people vulnerable to discrimination, violence, and criminalization: Asian women’s hands fail to be legible to fingerprint devices; eyes with cataracts hinder iris scans; dark skin continues to be undetectable; and non-normative formations of age, gender, and race frequently fail successful detection. These examples illustrate that the abstract, surface calculations biometrics performs on the body are gross, harmful reductions.

A visual motif in biometric facial recognition is the minimal, colorful diagrams that visualize over the face for authentication, verification, and tracking purposes. These diagrams are a kind of abstraction gone bad, a visualization of the reduction of the human to a standardized, ideological diagram. When these diagrams are extracted from the humans they cover over, they appear as harsh and sharp incongruous structures; they are, in fact, digital portraits of dehumanization.

Face Cages is a dramatization of the abstract violence of the biometric diagram. In this installation and performance work, four queer artists, including micha cárdenas, Elle Mehrmand, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, and Zach Blas, generate biometric diagrams of their faces, which are then fabricated as three-dimensional metal objects, evoking a material resonance with handcuffs, prison bars, and torture devices used during the Medieval period and slavery in the United States. The metal face cages are then worn in endurance performances for video. Face Cages is presented as an installation that features the four performance videos and four metal face cages.

The computational biometric diagram, a supposedly perfect measuring and accounting of the face, once materialized as a physical object, transforms into a cage that does not easily fit the human head, that is extremely painful to wear. These cages exaggerate and perform the irreconcilability of the biometric diagram with the materiality of the human face itself–and the violence that occurs when the two are forced to coincide.

Digital Human, Series 18, Episode 6: Faceless

Hong Kong’s Face Mask Ban Is Just Pissing People Off

Digital Human, Series 18, Episode 6: Faceless

 A stolen life – A new perspective and everything in between | Neda Soltani | TEDxRWTHAachen

Digital Human, Series 18, Episode 6: Faceless

How brands are using emotion-detection technology – Econsultancy:

Market research within the film industry is usually qualitative, with data being manually collated from surveys, reviews, and post-screening responses.

Disney, however, has been using technology to determine how audiences enjoy its movies, specifically creating an AI-powered algorithm that can recognise complex facial expressions and even predict upcoming emotions.

The software – which involves a method called ‘factorised variational auto encoders’ (FVAE) – captured people’s faces using infrared cameras during movie screenings including ‘The Jungle Book’ and ‘Star Wars: The Force Awakens’.

After just a few minutes of tracking facial behaviour, the algorithm was advanced enough to be able to predict when they would smile or laugh (in relation to specific moments in the movies).

Welp, well’s that’s not creepy in the slightest… :/

Digital Human: Series 17, Episode 1 – Numb