Category: space

The star of #SpaceWeek isn’t a star at all.

Discover the #WondersOfTheMoon Friday, July 19 at 10pm on @BBCAmerica.

50 years ago this week…

1. The Saturn V launch vehicle (SA-506) for the Apollo 11 mission liftoff at 8:32 am CDT, July 16, 1969, from launch complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center.

2. Apollo 11 Official Crew Portrait. L-R: Neil A. Armstrong, Commander; Michael Collins, Command Module Pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module Pilot.

3. Buzz Aldrin’s bootprint in the lunar soil.

4. Buzz Aldrin poses beside the deployed United States flag during an Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. 

5. Mission Operations Control Room of the Mission Control Center applauding the splashdown & success of Apollo 11.

6. President Richard M. Nixon welcomes the Apollo 11 astronauts home aboard the USS Hornet, prime recovery ship for the mission.

7. Full Moon photographed from Apollo 11 during its trans-Earth journey homeward, 10,000 nautical miles away.

All images courtesy of @nasa.

Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 with @bbcamerica Space Week starting July 15 with two new lunar documentaries and classic space-themed programs.

How Silicon Valley helps spread the same sterile aesthetic across the world:

It’s easy to see how social media shapes our interactions on the internet, through web browsers, feeds, and apps. Yet technology is also shaping the physical world, influencing the places we go and how we behave in areas of our lives that didn’t heretofore seem so digital. Think of the traffic app Waze rerouting cars in Los Angeles and disrupting otherwise quiet neighborhoods; Airbnb parachuting groups of international tourists into residential communities; Instagram spreading IRL lifestyle memes; or Foursquare sending traveling businessmen to the same cafe over and over again.

We could call this strange geography created by technology “AirSpace.” It’s the realm of coffee shops, bars, startup offices, and co-live / work spaces that share the same hallmarks everywhere you go: a profusion of symbols of comfort and quality, at least to a certain connoisseurial mindset. Minimalist furniture. Craft beer and avocado toast. Reclaimed wood. Industrial lighting. Cortados. Fast internet. The homogeneity of these spaces means that traveling between them is frictionless, a value that Silicon Valley prizes and cultural influencers like Schwarzmann take advantage of. Changing places can be as painless as reloading a website. You might not even realize you’re not where you started.

It’s possible to travel all around the world and never leave AirSpace, and some people don’t. Well-off travelers like Kevin Lynch, an ad executive who lived in Hong Kong Airbnbs for three years, are abandoning permanent houses for digital nomadism. Itinerant entrepreneurs, floating on venture capital, might head to a Bali accelerator for six months as easily as going to the grocery store. AirSpace is their home.

Digital Human: Series 16, Episode 1: Gentrification

Telstar, a satellite and a pop culture phenomenon, began transmitting television signals on this day in 1962 – a trans-Atlantic mix of JFK, the Eiffel Tower, Walter Cronkite, Richard Dimbleby and much more. These splendid pictures come from some of those early transmissions. Click each picture for the original caption.

Telstar, a satellite and a pop culture phenomenon, began transmitting television signals on this day in 1962 – a trans-Atlantic mix of JFK, the Eiffel Tower, Walter Cronkite, Richard Dimbleby and much more. These splendid pictures come from some of those early transmissions. Click each picture for the original caption.